Adventure stories – Great Mum Adventure http://greatmumadventure.com/ Fri, 06 May 2022 01:17:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://greatmumadventure.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/great.png Adventure stories – Great Mum Adventure http://greatmumadventure.com/ 32 32 The Surprisingly Long History of ‘Choose Your Own Adventure’ Stories | Innovation https://greatmumadventure.com/the-surprisingly-long-history-of-choose-your-own-adventure-stories-innovation/ Wed, 04 May 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://greatmumadventure.com/the-surprisingly-long-history-of-choose-your-own-adventure-stories-innovation/ Always from Black Mirror: Bandersnatch (2018). Courtesy of Netflix Netflix’s New Original Horror Movie choose or die activates an interactive computer game called “CURS>R”, which resembles a classic 80s adventure program in which a user inputs text to advance the story. Naturally, there’s a twist – the protagonist discovers that every choice in the game, […]]]>

Always from Black Mirror: Bandersnatch (2018).
Courtesy of Netflix

Netflix’s New Original Horror Movie choose or die activates an interactive computer game called “CURS>R”, which resembles a classic 80s adventure program in which a user inputs text to advance the story. Naturally, there’s a twist – the protagonist discovers that every choice in the game, no matter how small, will determine whether she and the people around her stay alive.

While the movie itself isn’t interactive (something that might have helped rehabilitate the plot), the release reflects Netflix’s growing interest in choose-your-own-adventure style programming. Since the beginnings of Black Mirror: Bandersnatch in 2018, the streaming service steadily invested in these titles. It’s easy to be a little cynical about this push for interactive programming, which feels like a ploy for Netflix to find new relevance as a mobile gaming platform, especially now that it’s reporting its first major losses. subscription in a decade. Still, I’m excited to see where it’s going, as this format is ripe with the potential to take us out of linear narratives and democratize storytelling, empowering each viewer to explore possible scenarios and decide what should happen next.

The Surprisingly Long History of Stories

A page from a Song dynasty (960-1279) printed book of the I Ching (Yi Jing, Classic of Changes or Book of Changes).

Public domain

The concept behind interactive storytelling is not new. We can say that it goes back to I Ching or book of mutations, the ancient Chinese manual of divination and prophecy that uses cleromancy (the casting of lots) to read its predictive text. Before the computer age, contemporary scholars Anthony J. Niesz and Norman N. Holland argue for expanding the definition of rudimentary interactive form to include “alternative endings to any narrative, either revising of the author (as in great expectations [1861]) or deliberately (as in The Threepenny Opera [1928])”.

But it was American authors Doris Webster and Mary Alden Hopkins who get credit for pioneering the concept as we know it today with the 1930 publication of Consider the consequences! The romance novel, which included 43 alternate endings, lets the reader decide the fate of Helen Rogers and her suitors Jed Harringdale and Saunders Mead.

Scholar James Ryan, who shed light on this forgotten novel in 2017, pointed out that while the concept of the plot may seem obvious to us now, Webster and Hopkins’ interactive branching narrative was revolutionary at the time. . “It’s a radical idea,” Ryan said in an interview with KZSC Santa Cruz, “that you can bundle multiple plot paths into one book and let the reader decide which paths to take.”

Another founding text from this era is the 1941 short story by Argentine writer and poet Jorge Luis Borges “El jardín de senderos que se bifurcan” (“The garden of the paths that fork”). Although the philosophical work is not interactive itself, the pathways and directions of alternate realities it suggests became an important early offering in the realm of interactive fiction – and is even considered the earliest precursor to the realm of interactive fiction. ‘hypertext, as defined by computer programmer Theodor Holm Nelson, who coined the term more than two decades later, in 1965, as a form of non-sequential writing – or “a series of pieces of text connected by links which offer the reader different paths”. (Interesting historical note, American scientist and policymaker contemporary to Borges, Vannevar Bush, also foreshadowed the concept of hypertext with his fictional “Memex” machine, which used “tracks” to link books, recordings, and other forms of communication in a non-linear storytelling manner.)

Advances in technology have continued to push interactive fiction out of the theoretical into the conceptual. Leaps in filmmaking, for example, led to the launch of the first interactive film, the Kinoautomatein 1967. Presented for the first time in the Czechoslovak pavilion at the Universal Exhibition in Montreal, the film (which was originally titled Člověk a jeho dům: A man and his house) was shown in a custom-built theater with green and red buttons installed on each seat. During the screening, the action was interrupted from time to time, so that a moderator could appear on stage and ask the audience to vote on questions that propelled the plot, such as:

Should Mr. Novak let a woman dressed only in a towel into his apartment, just before his wife arrives home?

Should Mr. Novak rush into an apartment despite a tenant blocking his way?

Should Mr. Novak knock someone out to draw attention to a small fire?

No matter how they responded to the prompts, the movie always ended the same way: a burning building. Was the film a political statement against fixed elections? A satire of determinism? These questions swirled as the World’s Fair became a resounding success and awakened filmmakers to the possibilities of interactive cinema. According to Alena, the daughter of director Radúz Činčera, after his debut, “all major Hollywood studios” wanted to fire the Kinoautomatebut the Czech government, owner of the film, refused to sell.

Dust jacket of the 1930 first edition of Consider the Consequences!  by Doris Webster and Mary Alden Hopkins.

Dust jacket of the 1930 first edition of Consider the Consequences! by Doris Webster and Mary Alden Hopkins.

Fair Use

If things had gone otherwise, the Kinoautomate might have become a household name, pushing Americans’ idea of ​​what interactive technology was capable of. It joined the ranks of other experimental literature emerging at the time, such as Julio Cortázar’s 1963 book Rayuela (translated into English by Hopscotch in 1966), which allows the reader to “jump” through 155 chapters using an “instruction board”, and Robert Coover’s disturbing 1969 short story “The Babysitter”, where a night of babysitting could be as mundane as a quiet night watching TV or end in increasingly disturbing storylines, like the babysitter being hunted down, raped, and murdered.

Instead, most Americans’ first encounter with interactive fiction came through the mainstream success of the Choose Your Own Adventure novels. Lawyer Edward Packard came up with the concept in 1969, when he told his daughters a story about a man on a desert island. “I couldn’t think of what was to happen next,” Packard later recalled to Market, so he asked his children what they would do. The girls provided two different responses, and Packard saw a genre with potential. “They couldn’t just identify with the main character, but they could be the main character,” he said.

Packard struggled to sell the concept at first – “It was just too weird and too new”, he later said – but publisher and author RA Montgomery, having worked in the role-playing game design, finally recognized its potential. In 1979, the Choose Your Own Adventure series officially launched with The cave of timewhere you might encounter a T-Rex or a UFO, depending on the route you choose to travel.

The series attracted a wide readership; however, its stereotypical style gave the genre a bad name. As one English scholar put it bluntly, “in terms of literary quality, many of the multi-story books are real skunks.” But it’s important to remember that the series was aimed at children, who liked the straightforward simplicity of the questions, such as: “If you take the left branch, go to page 20. If you take the right branch, go on page 61. If you exit the cave, go to page 21.

Today, books, video and computer games, television, and movies continue to push the boundaries of what interactive fiction can do. The potential control readers can have over the story can sometimes seem downright radical (take author Stuart Moulthrop’s mind-bending hyperfiction text Victory Garden). But decisions don’t have to be extreme to have an impact; there’s something to be said for the more everyday of choose-your-own plotlines that keep popping up (for me, one of the most anticipated offerings on the horizon right now is the first interactive romantic comedy). After all, no matter how heavy the decisions are in these storylines, the act of choice remains central to each one and reminds us that not only is there a multiverse of possibilities, but that each of our decisions can create a ripple. . effect.

Like Consider the consequences! argued in 1930, “life is not a continuous line from cradle to grave.” On the contrary, explains the novel in its introductory text, our journeys consist of “many short lines, each ending in a choice, and a bifurcation to the right and to the left” which lead us to always more choices.

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Mighty Mouse Adventure Stories, up for auction https://greatmumadventure.com/mighty-mouse-adventure-stories-up-for-auction/ Mon, 04 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://greatmumadventure.com/mighty-mouse-adventure-stories-up-for-auction/ | In 1941, Captain Marvel comic book publisher Fawcett Publications touted its mammoth year Christmas comics and comic book gift as “the largest comic in existence” at 324 pages. But in 1953, the publisher St John exceeded them. Mighty Mouse Adventure Stories weighed in at 384 pages, and is perhaps the largest American comic book […]]]>

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In 1941, Captain Marvel comic book publisher Fawcett Publications touted its mammoth year Christmas comics and comic book gift as “the largest comic in existence” at 324 pages. But in 1953, the publisher St John exceeded them. Mighty Mouse Adventure Stories weighed in at 384 pages, and is perhaps the largest American comic book published to date. A bounce edition of the earlier unsold St John Mighty Mouse comics, Mighty Mouse Adventure Stories is the largest square giant from a publisher that has published many giant comics, some of which are highly sought after. The greatest comic of the Golden Age – and probably far beyond – there is a Mighty Mouse Adventure Stories nn (St. John, 1953) Condition: GD/VG Auctioned 3-4 April 2022 This Week Sunday & Monday Comics Select Heritage Auctions Auction #122214.

Mighty Mouse Adventure Stories nn (St. John, 1953)

Mighty Mouse Made His Marvel Comics Debut Terry-Toons Comics #38 in August 1942, and the publisher later turned the character into his own title. Publisher St John took over the numbering of these two Marvel series in 1951. In the late 1940s and early 1950s, St John also used giant editions in its line of titles perhaps better than any other editor at the time. St John published giant editions of Powerful mouse, Little Audreyand perhaps more particularly used the format of the title Giant comic book editions – which included the now highly sought after Giant Comic Editions #12 (Diary Secrets) and Giant comic editions #15which are coveted for their Matt Boulanger blankets.

Like many giants of this period, the higher price and production costs meant that there were far fewer products than the typical release of the title and publisher in question, and this one was long regarded as rare by serious collectors. More than just a Mighty Mouse comic, it’s the greatest comic of the Golden Age, and there’s a Mighty Mouse Adventure Stories nn (St. John, 1953) Condition: GD/VG Auctioned 3-4 April 2022 This Week Sunday & Monday Comics Select Heritage Auctions Auction #122214.

Mighty Mouse Adventure Stories nn (St. John, 1953)
Mighty Mouse Adventure Stories nn (St. John, 1953)

nn (St. John, 1953) Condition: GD/VG. Only the third copy Heritage has offered of this hard-to-find book and the first we’ve seen in seven years. Giant tome of 384 pages on rebound problems. Gerber “7” or “rare”. Overstreet 2021 GD 2.0 value = $60; Value VG 4.0 = $120.

Sponsored by Heritage
Posted in: Comics, Sponsored by Heritage, Vintage Paper | Tagged: Atomic Age, Mighty Mouse, St John

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Our most popular adventure stories of 2021 https://greatmumadventure.com/our-most-popular-adventure-stories-of-2021/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 22:03:31 +0000 https://greatmumadventure.com/our-most-popular-adventure-stories-of-2021/ The harsh Sangre de Cristos are full of thirteen. Photo by Sarah Banks Adventure Accessible hikes to the new outdoor clothing mecca, here is 5280 best adventure stories of 2021. By the staff December 28, 2021 By Angela Ufheil, Geoff Van Dyke, Ryan Wichelns, Sarah Banks | September 2021 The state’s fourteen centennials have all […]]]>
The harsh Sangre de Cristos are full of thirteen. Photo by Sarah Banks

Adventure

Accessible hikes to the new outdoor clothing mecca, here is 5280 best adventure stories of 2021.


By Angela Ufheil, Geoff Van Dyke, Ryan Wichelns, Sarah Banks | September 2021

The state’s fourteen centennials have all the glory, but Colorado’s 13,000-foot mountains are just as beautiful and much less crowded.

By Lindsey B. King | November 2021

A man near his tent as the sunsets over Loveland Pass
Photo by Eric Schuette

We asked local backcountry veterans for tips, tricks and tips that will help you prepare, stay warm, sleep (relatively) well, eat well, be safe and move on. a great time in Colorado’s winter wonderland.

By Lindsey B. King | September 2021

Cliff Palace at Mesa Verde National Park. Photo by Seth K. Hughes

Everything you need to know to visit this cultural wonder, and do so with respect for the people who once made their home there.

By Megan Michelson | June 2021

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

Whether you’re in a wheelchair or hiking with a stroller, these Colorado trails have something for everyone.

By Megan Michelson | June 2021

Photo courtesy of Unsplash

Summer is the season to look for chanterelles and porcini mushrooms in the heights of the Rockies. Here’s how and where to find mushrooms you can eat.

By Sarah Banks and Spencer Campbell | August 2021

Boulder Mesa Trail. Photo by Sarah Banks

From training tips and essential equipment to the best routes near Denver, here’s everything you need to know to learn to run in Centennial State.

By Nicholas Hunt | May 2021

Mike Rutter, the Boulder Mountainbike Alliance Trails Program Director, at a vantage point on the new Hard Money mountain bike trail. Photo by Nicholas Hunt

The Hard Money Trail is just the second specially designed downhill trail for mountain biking in the entire region. And it rocks.

By Elizabeth Miller | May 2021

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

Last spring, the patrollers of each ski resort voted on whether to negotiate better conditions through collective bargaining. Although they achieved different results, the two groups remain concerned about compensation and retention.

By Nicholas Hunt | October 2021

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

Anti-geolocation champions believe their campaign protects fragile ecosystems; however, critics say they are playing a game of estrangement with our public lands. Who is right ?

By Courtney Holden | June 2021

Pearl Street Mall. Photo courtesy of Paul Sableman / Flickr via Creative Commons

With the additions of Backcountry, Black Diamond, and Stio this summer, the iconic avenue is officially the mecca of outerwear.


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Buffy, Sissy and Colleen: Traveling author writes adventure stories for children | New https://greatmumadventure.com/buffy-sissy-and-colleen-traveling-author-writes-adventure-stories-for-children-new/ Fri, 03 Dec 2021 15:23:00 +0000 https://greatmumadventure.com/buffy-sissy-and-colleen-traveling-author-writes-adventure-stories-for-children-new/ WHATCOM – Colleen Chapman has always loved animals. Especially cats. However, the author of children’s books fondly remembers his first book, which was not about cats. “I wrote a children’s book in third grade about an owl and a skunk who became friends,” Chapman said. “I still have this book. I guess it’s always been […]]]>

WHATCOM – Colleen Chapman has always loved animals. Especially cats.

However, the author of children’s books fondly remembers his first book, which was not about cats.

“I wrote a children’s book in third grade about an owl and a skunk who became friends,” Chapman said. “I still have this book. I guess it’s always been in me to do that and it’s just come out now. “

After a career in the pharmaceutical industry, Chapman decided a few years ago that she was tired of her corporate job.

“I lost one of my best friends to cancer in 2018 and it made me reassess what I was doing with my life,” Chapman said. “We are here for a short time. The future is not guaranteed, and neither is our health.

Today Chapman writes about the traveling adventures of Buffy and Sissy – her cats. She’s written three books: Buffy & Sissy Go To Italy (2020), Buffy & Sissy Go To Hawaii (2021), and The Buffy & Sissy Go On a Road Trip, which Chapman said she hopes to bring to the public. the end of the year.

Growing up in Custer, Chapman attended Mount Baker High School in Deming before moving to California to study at Sonoma State University. In college, Chapman majored in English.

“But my career over the past 20 years has not been one where creative writing has been encouraged,” she said.

Before Chapman entered the pharmaceutical industry, she created a parenting publication in the mid-1990s. However, her responsibilities were more about production management than writing.

As an author of children’s books, Chapman said she had “a great deal of respect for writers and found the genre of children’s books to be more difficult than I thought.”

“Keeping the word count was tough,” Chapman said. “Producing a children’s book isn’t just about writing history. I also provide full details of what will happen on each page until the cats wear the expressions on their faces. You need to be very specific in describing each scene so that the illustrator can capture your vision.

In some ways, it’s ironic that Chapman is now an author. Little, she wanted to be a teacher. Now, in a way, Chapman thinks she teaches through her books.

“The Traveling Kittens shows kids what it’s like to travel, and they even learn a few words in different languages ​​as well as geography,” Chapman said. “Each book has a language page if it is in a country with a unique language. I am also including a map of where the kittens visited.

Live the ‘journey kittens brand

It wasn’t just the writing aspect of his career that got Chapman hooked. It is also the journey.

“Seeing a part of the world is important to me, and I didn’t want to wait until I was 70,” Chapman said. “I’m traveling full time now, and it’s exhausting. It would have been even better if I could have done it in my twenties. I know I would have been a digital nomad if these opportunities had been available as they are now.

Living a life of writing and traveling, the way Chapman saw it, meant being more minimalist than in the past.

“It meant selling everything,” she said. “It wasn’t hard for me psychologically to do that, and I feel so much better. We’re so busy owning things, but those things tie you up. I guess that’s why so many retirees are downsizing.

But Chapman has kept his place at Birch Bay, which provides a place to remember him.

“My hope for the future is to travel part of the year to support and promote the books and actually experience the walking kittens brand,” Chapman said. “Then I would like to spend the rest of the time in Birch Bay near my family. I will always keep some sort of home in Whatcom County.


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Obituary: Wilbur Smith, best-selling novelist whose adventure stories reflect his love for Africa https://greatmumadventure.com/obituary-wilbur-smith-best-selling-novelist-whose-adventure-stories-reflect-his-love-for-africa/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 13:07:36 +0000 https://greatmumadventure.com/obituary-wilbur-smith-best-selling-novelist-whose-adventure-stories-reflect-his-love-for-africa/ Death: November 13, 2021. WILBUR Smith, who died at the age of 88, was a multi-million-selling author who wrote adventure novels set primarily in Africa, where he grew up. His books weren’t literature, he said, they were stories, and although some critics dismissed the books as sexist or old-fashioned, they were still popular for half […]]]>

Death: November 13, 2021.

WILBUR Smith, who died at the age of 88, was a multi-million-selling author who wrote adventure novels set primarily in Africa, where he grew up. His books weren’t literature, he said, they were stories, and although some critics dismissed the books as sexist or old-fashioned, they were still popular for half a century. Indeed, his name became a trademark, Smith having co-authored books until his death.

Most of the books and the characters they contain date back to Smith’s childhood and youth in Northern Rhodesia, now in Zambia. Young Wilbur was extremely comfortable and happy there in the countryside of his parents’ 25,000 acre ranch. Indeed, he dreaded being sent on long train journeys to a boarding school in South Africa.

His childhood at the ranch meant that from an early age he took for granted the harsh and often brutal nature of life in the African wilderness. His grandfather, who had commanded a machine gun team during the Zulu War, told him stories about his time in combat; he also remembers seeing his grandfather slaughter pigs with a knife which he then gave to young Wilbur. For the rest of his life Smith collected knives with relish and when a friend gave him one as a gift he wrote his thanks on the back of a £ 10 bill.

When he was away from the ranch at school, his only sign of promise was in English, and his initial ambition was to be a journalist. However, his father told him he would starve and instead studied business at Rhodes University in South Africa. He graduated in 1954 and then graduated as a chartered accountant.

His desire to write had not, however, disappeared. After selling a short story to a magazine for £ 70 – double his monthly accountant salary – he decided to embark on a novel, but it was rejected by all the publishers he sent it to. Years later, he said he occasionally took the manuscript out of the drawer and looked at it when he needed a lesson in humility, although he later destroyed the only copy so that it could not be. published after his death.

Smith’s first published novel was When The Lion Feeds, in 1964, and he established the formula right away. Centered around the sons of a ranch owner, it is full of stories of gold mining, big game hunting, and beautiful women. The book, and most of those that followed, were all about Africa and its education. “Africa is the land of dreams,” said Smith, “and the inspiration behind much of my writing.”

Smith was also a big game hunter himself and first shot lions to defend his father’s herd of cattle when he was 13. He always thought, however, that he had to eat what he had cut down and therefore had tasted just about everything over the years. Lion, he said, tasted like old tomcat urine. Elephant was like eating barbed wire even though the cheeks were delicious. As for the crocodile, it was very good, especially the tail.

By the late 1960s, Smith had embarked on a hugely successful writing career based on themes his readers loved: treasure on tropical islands, piracy on the high seas, gold mines in South Africa, hunters. big game, diamond merchants and ruthless slaves. , and the war in Arabia and Khartoum. He also wrote a series of novels set in ancient Egypt, which were his own favorites.

In total, there were 49 novels, more than half of which were set in Africa and most of which contained stories directly inspired by his own experiences. He said he had been accidentally shot three times, charged with elephants and crocodiles and attacked by sharks, and escaped death from illness on several occasions – once in as a newborn when he contracted cerebral malaria, and later polio when he was a teenager.

All of these experiences, and adventure, went into the books, and Smith vehemently defended the novels against criticism, especially when fashions and attitudes changed.

Speaking to the Wall Street Journal, he dismissed the idea that his books were too sordid, colonialist, or stereotypical. “I have been accused of violence and cruelty to animals and people. I have been accused of racism, of sacrilege. The opinions I present are not my own. They are my characters. He also said that writing was like hunting with a dog game: “I let the characters run, I follow and record.”

A market that seemed more resistant to Smith’s formula than most was America, where his books sold well but not as much as elsewhere, and so in 2013 he signed a $ 24 million contract for six books with HarperCollins in an effort to build a bigger following in the United States.

Several film versions of his novels have been made, but they never really captured the buzz and allure of the originals. There was The Dark of the Sun, in 1968, with Rod Taylor; Or (1974) with Roger Moore; and Shout at the Devil (1968), also with Moore. Smith also wrote a memoir in 2018, On Leopard Rock.

Speaking after his death, his editors Bonnier Books described him as a passionate advocate of adventure fiction. His longtime agent Kevin Conroy Scott also described him as an icon beloved by his fans.

“His knowledge of Africa and his imagination knew no bounds,” Scott said. “His work ethic and powerful and elegant writing style have made him known to millions of people. I cherish the role of working alongside his wife Niso and the Wilbur and Niso Smith Foundation to keep the flame of his fictional universe alive for many years to come.

Smith has married four times and is survived by his fourth wife Mokhiniso Rakhimova, whom he met while browsing a branch of WH Smith in London. He is also survived by his children: Shaun and Christian, with his first wife, Anne Rennie, and his son Lawrence, with his second, Jewell Slabbert. His third wife, Danielle Thomas, died of brain cancer in 1999.


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Hardware testers share their coolest winter 2021 adventure stories https://greatmumadventure.com/hardware-testers-share-their-coolest-winter-2021-adventure-stories/ Wed, 03 Nov 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://greatmumadventure.com/hardware-testers-share-their-coolest-winter-2021-adventure-stories/ Test for HikerThe Winter Gear Guide is a multi-month process. Our Editors and Category Managers scour the snowy regions of the country in search of inclement weather, epic journeys and insightful product reviews. Along the way, they embark on all kinds of adventures (and, sometimes, in difficult situations). Here are some of our favorite anecdotes […]]]>

Test for HikerThe Winter Gear Guide is a multi-month process. Our Editors and Category Managers scour the snowy regions of the country in search of inclement weather, epic journeys and insightful product reviews. Along the way, they embark on all kinds of adventures (and, sometimes, in difficult situations). Here are some of our favorite anecdotes from last winter’s testing cycle.

Eli Bernstein, material editor

When I think of memorable winter tests, it usually involves battling blowing snow or scavenging for air when going up a hill, or a combination of the two. But sometimes it’s just pure fun. On a full moon night last winter, I joined a group of backcountry skiers on Teton Pass outside of Jackson, Wyoming. The sky was clear and cloudless, and the moon illuminated Jackson Hole in the east as we grazed for a few minutes, then ski down a mellow ridge a few hundred feet away. This was the test portion of the trip: the thermometer was hovering around 0 ° F, and I was wearing underwear and a bouffant that I was taking notes on. (Spoiler: They were slightly insufficient for the cold of the night.) Once we got off the ridge, the fun began. The leader of this expedition had dug a fire pit in the snow earlier and we spent the next three hours sheltered from the freezing conditions by a roaring campfire and in good company. Once it got late we skied the rest of the way down the pass, with me the whole time sucking in the warmth of the fire as my face froze and my eyes filled with tears.

Corey Buhay, Packs Category Manager

I spent three days ice climbing in the notoriously rugged valley surrounding the North Fork of the Shoshone River in Wyoming. It wasn’t cold or windy, but the warm temperatures let the ice sink in, which meant we were soaked almost as soon as we started to climb. It did some good hardshell testing, and it definitely put our gloves to the test. I had to undergo three pairs a day.

Senior Digital Editor Adam Roy, Mid-Test (Photo: Adam Roy)

Adam Roy, digital editor

You wouldn’t normally think of Lincoln, Nebraska, as a place with climatic extremes. But when a snowstorm hit the town while I was visiting family, I decided to put on my Nordic skis and take an overnight getaway on the local trails. Only problem: it was -10 ° F, not counting the wind chill. Keeping a high tempo took most of the time, and a good mid layer (plus a few sturdy mittens) did the rest. The whispering snow underfoot and the full moon casting long shadows made up for the fact that I had to thaw my beard from my underwear in the car.

Steve Johnson, Trousers Category Manager

The scene: A freezing mid-January afternoon, it was snowing heavily, as I walked along the banks of the Mississippi near downtown St. Paul, Minneapolis. Just me and my rambunctious Rottweiler, weighing in at around five dollars. I wore a bouffant and a pair of REI winter pants, as well as some trusty Sorel boots. My dog ​​walked on a fringe of ice to investigate something shiny; the ice broke and he fell into it. I immediately ran to help him, but the ice shattered again and I got into the drink as well. The river was about 15 feet deep and breathtakingly cold. I stepped on the water with my feet trying to lift my dog’s weight towards freedom. It took a long time, but I got it out and managed to get my waterlogged car back to shore. The pants froze to ice cubes but kept most of the water from seeping through my long underwear to my bare skin. I shook the skein of outside ice and walked back to the car. Pants killer performance when it mattered most.

Shannon Davis, Editorial Director

Not all test stories come from extreme conditions. This is surely where you learn the most about your gear, but there are also the blue merle days, relatively warm, with a foot of fresh snow. You learn a lot these days too.

I really needed one of them after a family fear of Covid kept me from joining our team’s Editors’ Choice trip to Oregon’s Wallowa chain. As my coworkers exited the trailhead in Northwest Oregon, my buddy Josh and I butchered Hidden Valley in Rocky Mountain National Park. There was cool powder underfoot and sparkling flakes hovering in the rays of the sun. The descent on the Advanced Shelter Splitboard I was testing felt like a day at a resort. Such a float! Beautiful turns in the surf! We did three laps on lesser known trails in the valley and then had donuts. This outing was a worthy consolation prize and my favorite day to test out winter clothing last year.

Zoe Gates, Skills Writer

I’ve been skiing downhill ever since I learned to walk, but skiing uphill is a whole new ball game for me. During our Editors’ Choice trip to the Wallowas, I practiced my nascent skinning skills in all manner of spring conditions, from slippery morning crust to knee-deep sleet. I spent more time going up than down, and had my fair share of falls on the climbs. On the third day, a few of us climbed Burger Butte in a hot afternoon sun. I was terrified as we crossed a steep, slippery slope, struggling to keep my skis from slipping. Just below the summit our guide executed a sharp turn and did the final skin to the top. I froze under the turn: my kick-turns were awkward and often left me tangled in my own skis. But if I took them off and walked to the top, I was afraid of losing a ski on the steep slope. I felt like I was tilting backwards off the side of the mountain as I rocked my first ski. I took deep breaths as our guides shouted encouragement, gave me an internal pep talk, and lifted my other ski from the snow. My skis, finally side by side and in the right direction, sank into the snow. It wasn’t graceful, but I hadn’t fallen from the mountain. Burger Butte might not be the most technical summit in the world, but I felt a surge of pride as I joined my companions at the top.


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The North Face calls for your adventure stories https://greatmumadventure.com/the-north-face-calls-for-your-adventure-stories/ https://greatmumadventure.com/the-north-face-calls-for-your-adventure-stories/#respond Wed, 13 Oct 2021 15:30:30 +0000 https://greatmumadventure.com/the-north-face-calls-for-your-adventure-stories/ The Manual may earn a commission when you purchase through links on our site. Wu Tang Clan The Rza co-founder in his 1990’s The North Face-era Denali jacket. Do you have a great adventure story? A video of you and your The North Face gear could end up at the Museum of Modern Art in […]]]>

The Manual may earn a commission when you purchase through links on our site.

Wu Tang Clan The Rza co-founder in his 1990’s The North Face-era Denali jacket.

Do you have a great adventure story? A video of you and your The North Face gear could end up at the Museum of Modern Art in San Francisco next year.

On October 12, The North Face announced its fall brand campaign, It’s more than a jacket, an initiative to honor and celebrate the company’s 55-year adventure. To capture the stories behind its durable gear, the San Francisco-based adventure company is calling on explorers from around the world to submit stories and images of beloved and well-used products. The North Face will choose the best (and most emotional) stories to include in its official archives, which will come to life in a series of fall 2022 programs at SFMOMA. The exhibits will feature the most significant designs and stories in the history of the Bay Area Exploration Company, as well as submissions from famous adventurers and cultural icons.

“Our customers, the achievements they’ve accomplished and the memories they’ve created are an integral part of the rich DNA of our brand,” said Mike Ferris, vice president of global branding for The North Face in a statement. hurry. “With these archives, we commemorate the people, products and stories that continue to inspire our community and move the world forward.”

It’s more than a jacket joins music stars like Wu co-founder Tang RZA and LA’s HAIM in tandem with The North Face explorers Conrad Anker and Ingrid Backstrom, describing their adventure stories inside the attributes and gear of the Mark.

“In the ’90s, not only was The North Face the rugged and stylish outfit we needed on the streets of New York, it was more than a jacket as it was a witness,” RZA said in a promotional video. “It was a testimony of the brotherhood that we inspired and that inspired us. By entering this jacket into the archives, I have the chance to relive and preserve the memories I have lived forever. “

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As the campaign kicks off this fall, The North Face will present six new collections that pay homage to the brand’s DNA, drawing on its rich past to inspire future getaways. This will include the Nuptse, which, after outfitting the very first non-mechanized Antarctic crossing of the 1990s, will now be offered in a 100% recycled fabric version inspired by the gear that fitted the very first non-mechanized crossing with Antarctica in the 1990s (the transantarctic capsule).

To contribute to the official archives and potentially appear in the SFMOMA experience, post on social media using the hashtag #MoreThanAJacket. Additional information on “It’s more than a jacket” can be found at www.thenorthface.com.

Read more: How to venture out solo

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Innovative new mid-level series combines action-packed adventure stories with travel facts from cities around the world https://greatmumadventure.com/innovative-new-mid-level-series-combines-action-packed-adventure-stories-with-travel-facts-from-cities-around-the-world/ https://greatmumadventure.com/innovative-new-mid-level-series-combines-action-packed-adventure-stories-with-travel-facts-from-cities-around-the-world/#respond Wed, 08 Sep 2021 12:44:00 +0000 https://greatmumadventure.com/innovative-new-mid-level-series-combines-action-packed-adventure-stories-with-travel-facts-from-cities-around-the-world/ Mumbai, India, September 8, 2021 / PRNewswire / – When it comes to globetrotting, the Lander family is a well-traveled group. Thanks to their parents’ long-term careers, brother and sister duo Tara and Neil have seen the world’s most iconic cities, immersing themselves in their cultures, visiting attractions and monuments and learning more about its […]]]>

Mumbai, India, September 8, 2021 / PRNewswire / – When it comes to globetrotting, the Lander family is a well-traveled group. Thanks to their parents’ long-term careers, brother and sister duo Tara and Neil have seen the world’s most iconic cities, immersing themselves in their cultures, visiting attractions and monuments and learning more about its citizens, it’s when they’re not busy in hectic jaunts along the way. With its new intermediate series, Adventure cities, bestselling author Rishi Piparaiya is shaking up the category of travel adventure books, providing fascinating facts and information against the backdrop of the world’s busiest cities.

Twelve years Tara Lander and his ten-year-old brother Neil, along with their adorable Labrador, Sumo, are no strangers to intercontinental adventures. Their father, a brilliant scientist, frequently travels the world giving lectures and presentations at various conferences. Their mother, Amy lander, is a renowned chef and culinary influencer and her projects regularly take her to exotic places abroad. Between mom’s job and dad’s trips, the family has visited dozens of countries.

Humor, playful antics, and heart-pounding drama permeate this fun, action-packed adventure series, packed with fascinating facts about major international cities. The first four books, The Secret of the Snallygaster (Washington DC), framed in Hollywood (Los Angeles, California), Phar Lap’s Saddle Race (Melbourne, Australia), and The Men of BAGEL (New York City, new York), masterfully written by best-selling author Rishi Piparaiya, have twists and turns, memorable characters, and plenty of travel references that will instill a love of exploration and reading in young, mid-level readers.

An expert traveler, having visited nearly forty countries, Piparaiya prepared for the writing of these books by traveling to over fifty-five cities to research every attraction referenced in every story. It is backed by a global team of writers, researchers and illustrators, who have helped make each book as authentic as possible. Each book includes a reference section highlighting key elements including the history of the destination, famous people, maps, local foods, and fun facts. Adventure cities books (www.citiesofadventure.com), published by Bombay-based on Imaginara Legacies, are available now at major online and physical bookstores. Additional books with Sydney, Tokyo, Copenhagen, Boston, London, Istanbul, and more will follow soon.

For more information on author Rishi Piparaiya (www.rishipiparaiya.com), publisher Imaginara Legacies (www.imaginara.com) and the Adventure cities books (www.citiesofadventure.com), please contact [email protected] or at +91 90 825 76227

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Rishi Piparaiya is a bestselling author and former executive who left his career-leading corporate position to devote himself to his passion for travel and writing. His first job, Alley be damned, a humorous book on air travel, was a national bestseller in India and his second book, Job be damned, was an acclaimed satire on corporate life. Adventure cities is his first children’s series. Rishi holds an MBA from Cornell University and BA from Rochester University.

Media contact:
Rishi piparaiya
[email protected]
+91 90 825 76227

SOURCE Rishi Piparaiya

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Robert ‘Bob’ Harris on his love for adventure stories https://greatmumadventure.com/robert-bob-harris-on-his-love-for-adventure-stories/ https://greatmumadventure.com/robert-bob-harris-on-his-love-for-adventure-stories/#respond Sat, 07 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://greatmumadventure.com/robert-bob-harris-on-his-love-for-adventure-stories/ Author interview: Robert ‘Bob’ Harris on his love for adventure stories Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. to cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret A block arrow icon pointing right. E-mail An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook A Facebook “f” brand icon. Google An icon of the […]]]>




Author interview: Robert ‘Bob’ Harris on his love for adventure stories


































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Seven Swords blends classic adventure stories into something spectacular https://greatmumadventure.com/seven-swords-blends-classic-adventure-stories-into-something-spectacular/ https://greatmumadventure.com/seven-swords-blends-classic-adventure-stories-into-something-spectacular/#respond Fri, 18 Jun 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://greatmumadventure.com/seven-swords-blends-classic-adventure-stories-into-something-spectacular/ Seven Swords, from AfterShock Comics, mixes some of the world’s greatest adventure stories into an absolutely spectacular debut film. Spoilers for Seven swords # 1 before! AfterShock Comics New Seven swords mixes some of the world’s most enduring adventure stories into a catchy and spectacular comic book that is sure to be another hit for […]]]>

Seven Swords, from AfterShock Comics, mixes some of the world’s greatest adventure stories into an absolutely spectacular debut film.

Spoilers for Seven swords # 1 before!

AfterShock Comics New Seven swords mixes some of the world’s most enduring adventure stories into a catchy and spectacular comic book that is sure to be another hit for the company. Written by Evan Daugherty with illustrations by Riccardo Latina and colors by Valentina Bianconi, the first issue is now on sale in print and digital versions.

In less than a decade, AfterShock has grown into one of the most exciting publishers in the industry, bringing together established talents such as Garth Ennis and Paul Jenkins, as well as newcomers such as the Miranda brothers; the company has received numerous awards. AfterShock also brought in talent from outside the industry. Seven swords scribe Evan Daughtery comes from the world of cinema, having written films such as Snow White and the Hunter as well as the adaptation of Divergent. Daughtery teams up with Latina and Bianconi and appeals to those cinematic sensibilities Seven swords.


Related: AfterShock’s Almost American Spills Secrets of Real Life Spies

Seven swords uses the classic novel The three Musketeers by Alexander Dumas as a starting point. In the novel, the titular heroes team up with a new recruit, D’Artagnan, to stop the evil Cardinal Richelieu. Seven swords imagine a world where the Musketeers have been killed, and now Richelieu has turned to the dark world of occultism; it is up to d’Artagnan to stop him. Richelieu found an ancient weapon in Mexico and will stop at nothing to obtain it. D’Artagnan’s mentor, Treville, tells him to assemble a new team of warriors, all skilled with swords, to stop the evil Cardinal. He then meets, and fights, Sister Catalina, the group’s first recruit. Treville presents D’Artagnan with a list of the remaining members and among them are Don Juan and Cyrano de Bergerac. D’Artagnan must reassemble the team and stop Richelieu before it is too late.

AfterShock, seven swords

D’Artagnan and Richelieu are only the first in a line of characters, both fictional and historical, who make their appearance. Don Juan and Cyrano de Bergerac have both appeared in literary works and Sister Catalina can be considered a replacement for Joan of Arc. This skillful mix of classic literary and historical figures is reminiscent of Alan Moore and Kevin O’Neill League of Extraordinary Gentlemen. D’Artagnan must bring together seven different warriors to fight a common enemy, reminiscent of Akira Kurosawa’s epic Seven Samurai and its American remake The Magnificent Seven. It never seems derivative, as the creative team take the best aspects of everyone, creating an exciting debut issue that captivates readers and never lets them go.

AfterShock Seven swords # 1 is a spectacular start, giving classic adventure stories a new twist. Daughtery, Latina and Bianconi have created the next big title AfterShock, not to be missed.

Next: AfterShock’s Silver City Gives The Afterlife A Unique, Intricate Twist

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