Adventure stories – Great Mum Adventure http://greatmumadventure.com/ Sun, 21 Nov 2021 12:46:26 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://greatmumadventure.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/great.png Adventure stories – Great Mum Adventure http://greatmumadventure.com/ 32 32 Obituary: Wilbur Smith, best-selling novelist whose adventure stories reflect his love for Africa https://greatmumadventure.com/obituary-wilbur-smith-best-selling-novelist-whose-adventure-stories-reflect-his-love-for-africa/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 13:07:36 +0000 https://greatmumadventure.com/obituary-wilbur-smith-best-selling-novelist-whose-adventure-stories-reflect-his-love-for-africa/ Death: November 13, 2021. WILBUR Smith, who died at the age of 88, was a multi-million-selling author who wrote adventure novels set primarily in Africa, where he grew up. His books weren’t literature, he said, they were stories, and although some critics dismissed the books as sexist or old-fashioned, they were still popular for half […]]]>

Death: November 13, 2021.

WILBUR Smith, who died at the age of 88, was a multi-million-selling author who wrote adventure novels set primarily in Africa, where he grew up. His books weren’t literature, he said, they were stories, and although some critics dismissed the books as sexist or old-fashioned, they were still popular for half a century. Indeed, his name became a trademark, Smith having co-authored books until his death.

Most of the books and the characters they contain date back to Smith’s childhood and youth in Northern Rhodesia, now in Zambia. Young Wilbur was extremely comfortable and happy there in the countryside of his parents’ 25,000 acre ranch. Indeed, he dreaded being sent on long train journeys to a boarding school in South Africa.

His childhood at the ranch meant that from an early age he took for granted the harsh and often brutal nature of life in the African wilderness. His grandfather, who had commanded a machine gun team during the Zulu War, told him stories about his time in combat; he also remembers seeing his grandfather slaughter pigs with a knife which he then gave to young Wilbur. For the rest of his life Smith collected knives with relish and when a friend gave him one as a gift he wrote his thanks on the back of a £ 10 bill.

When he was away from the ranch at school, his only sign of promise was in English, and his initial ambition was to be a journalist. However, his father told him he would starve and instead studied business at Rhodes University in South Africa. He graduated in 1954 and then graduated as a chartered accountant.

His desire to write had not, however, disappeared. After selling a short story to a magazine for £ 70 – double his monthly accountant salary – he decided to embark on a novel, but it was rejected by all the publishers he sent it to. Years later, he said he occasionally took the manuscript out of the drawer and looked at it when he needed a lesson in humility, although he later destroyed the only copy so that it could not be. published after his death.

Smith’s first published novel was When The Lion Feeds, in 1964, and he established the formula right away. Centered around the sons of a ranch owner, it is full of stories of gold mining, big game hunting, and beautiful women. The book, and most of those that followed, were all about Africa and its education. “Africa is the land of dreams,” said Smith, “and the inspiration behind much of my writing.”

Smith was also a big game hunter himself and first shot lions to defend his father’s herd of cattle when he was 13. He always thought, however, that he had to eat what he had cut down and therefore had tasted just about everything over the years. Lion, he said, tasted like old tomcat urine. Elephant was like eating barbed wire even though the cheeks were delicious. As for the crocodile, it was very good, especially the tail.

By the late 1960s, Smith had embarked on a hugely successful writing career based on themes his readers loved: treasure on tropical islands, piracy on the high seas, gold mines in South Africa, hunters. big game, diamond merchants and ruthless slaves. , and the war in Arabia and Khartoum. He also wrote a series of novels set in ancient Egypt, which were his own favorites.

In total, there were 49 novels, more than half of which were set in Africa and most of which contained stories directly inspired by his own experiences. He said he had been accidentally shot three times, charged with elephants and crocodiles and attacked by sharks, and escaped death from illness on several occasions – once in as a newborn when he contracted cerebral malaria, and later polio when he was a teenager.

All of these experiences, and adventure, went into the books, and Smith vehemently defended the novels against criticism, especially when fashions and attitudes changed.

Speaking to the Wall Street Journal, he dismissed the idea that his books were too sordid, colonialist, or stereotypical. “I have been accused of violence and cruelty to animals and people. I have been accused of racism, of sacrilege. The opinions I present are not my own. They are my characters. He also said that writing was like hunting with a dog game: “I let the characters run, I follow and record.”

A market that seemed more resistant to Smith’s formula than most was America, where his books sold well but not as much as elsewhere, and so in 2013 he signed a $ 24 million contract for six books with HarperCollins in an effort to build a bigger following in the United States.

Several film versions of his novels have been made, but they never really captured the buzz and allure of the originals. There was The Dark of the Sun, in 1968, with Rod Taylor; Or (1974) with Roger Moore; and Shout at the Devil (1968), also with Moore. Smith also wrote a memoir in 2018, On Leopard Rock.

Speaking after his death, his editors Bonnier Books described him as a passionate advocate of adventure fiction. His longtime agent Kevin Conroy Scott also described him as an icon beloved by his fans.

“His knowledge of Africa and his imagination knew no bounds,” Scott said. “His work ethic and powerful and elegant writing style have made him known to millions of people. I cherish the role of working alongside his wife Niso and the Wilbur and Niso Smith Foundation to keep the flame of his fictional universe alive for many years to come.

Smith has married four times and is survived by his fourth wife Mokhiniso Rakhimova, whom he met while browsing a branch of WH Smith in London. He is also survived by his children: Shaun and Christian, with his first wife, Anne Rennie, and his son Lawrence, with his second, Jewell Slabbert. His third wife, Danielle Thomas, died of brain cancer in 1999.


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The North Face calls for your adventure stories https://greatmumadventure.com/the-north-face-calls-for-your-adventure-stories/ https://greatmumadventure.com/the-north-face-calls-for-your-adventure-stories/#respond Wed, 13 Oct 2021 15:30:30 +0000 https://greatmumadventure.com/the-north-face-calls-for-your-adventure-stories/ The Manual may earn a commission when you purchase through links on our site. Wu Tang Clan The Rza co-founder in his 1990’s The North Face-era Denali jacket. Do you have a great adventure story? A video of you and your The North Face gear could end up at the Museum of Modern Art in […]]]>

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Wu Tang Clan The Rza co-founder in his 1990’s The North Face-era Denali jacket.

Do you have a great adventure story? A video of you and your The North Face gear could end up at the Museum of Modern Art in San Francisco next year.

On October 12, The North Face announced its fall brand campaign, It’s more than a jacket, an initiative to honor and celebrate the company’s 55-year adventure. To capture the stories behind its durable gear, the San Francisco-based adventure company is calling on explorers from around the world to submit stories and images of beloved and well-used products. The North Face will choose the best (and most emotional) stories to include in its official archives, which will come to life in a series of fall 2022 programs at SFMOMA. The exhibits will feature the most significant designs and stories in the history of the Bay Area Exploration Company, as well as submissions from famous adventurers and cultural icons.

“Our customers, the achievements they’ve accomplished and the memories they’ve created are an integral part of the rich DNA of our brand,” said Mike Ferris, vice president of global branding for The North Face in a statement. hurry. “With these archives, we commemorate the people, products and stories that continue to inspire our community and move the world forward.”

It’s more than a jacket joins music stars like Wu co-founder Tang RZA and LA’s HAIM in tandem with The North Face explorers Conrad Anker and Ingrid Backstrom, describing their adventure stories inside the attributes and gear of the Mark.

“In the ’90s, not only was The North Face the rugged and stylish outfit we needed on the streets of New York, it was more than a jacket as it was a witness,” RZA said in a promotional video. “It was a testimony of the brotherhood that we inspired and that inspired us. By entering this jacket into the archives, I have the chance to relive and preserve the memories I have lived forever. “

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As the campaign kicks off this fall, The North Face will present six new collections that pay homage to the brand’s DNA, drawing on its rich past to inspire future getaways. This will include the Nuptse, which, after outfitting the very first non-mechanized Antarctic crossing of the 1990s, will now be offered in a 100% recycled fabric version inspired by the gear that fitted the very first non-mechanized crossing with Antarctica in the 1990s (the transantarctic capsule).

To contribute to the official archives and potentially appear in the SFMOMA experience, post on social media using the hashtag #MoreThanAJacket. Additional information on “It’s more than a jacket” can be found at www.thenorthface.com.

Read more: How to venture out solo

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Innovative new mid-level series combines action-packed adventure stories with travel facts from cities around the world https://greatmumadventure.com/innovative-new-mid-level-series-combines-action-packed-adventure-stories-with-travel-facts-from-cities-around-the-world/ https://greatmumadventure.com/innovative-new-mid-level-series-combines-action-packed-adventure-stories-with-travel-facts-from-cities-around-the-world/#respond Wed, 08 Sep 2021 12:44:00 +0000 https://greatmumadventure.com/innovative-new-mid-level-series-combines-action-packed-adventure-stories-with-travel-facts-from-cities-around-the-world/ Mumbai, India, September 8, 2021 / PRNewswire / – When it comes to globetrotting, the Lander family is a well-traveled group. Thanks to their parents’ long-term careers, brother and sister duo Tara and Neil have seen the world’s most iconic cities, immersing themselves in their cultures, visiting attractions and monuments and learning more about its […]]]>

Mumbai, India, September 8, 2021 / PRNewswire / – When it comes to globetrotting, the Lander family is a well-traveled group. Thanks to their parents’ long-term careers, brother and sister duo Tara and Neil have seen the world’s most iconic cities, immersing themselves in their cultures, visiting attractions and monuments and learning more about its citizens, it’s when they’re not busy in hectic jaunts along the way. With its new intermediate series, Adventure cities, bestselling author Rishi Piparaiya is shaking up the category of travel adventure books, providing fascinating facts and information against the backdrop of the world’s busiest cities.

Twelve years Tara Lander and his ten-year-old brother Neil, along with their adorable Labrador, Sumo, are no strangers to intercontinental adventures. Their father, a brilliant scientist, frequently travels the world giving lectures and presentations at various conferences. Their mother, Amy lander, is a renowned chef and culinary influencer and her projects regularly take her to exotic places abroad. Between mom’s job and dad’s trips, the family has visited dozens of countries.

Humor, playful antics, and heart-pounding drama permeate this fun, action-packed adventure series, packed with fascinating facts about major international cities. The first four books, The Secret of the Snallygaster (Washington DC), framed in Hollywood (Los Angeles, California), Phar Lap’s Saddle Race (Melbourne, Australia), and The Men of BAGEL (New York City, new York), masterfully written by best-selling author Rishi Piparaiya, have twists and turns, memorable characters, and plenty of travel references that will instill a love of exploration and reading in young, mid-level readers.

An expert traveler, having visited nearly forty countries, Piparaiya prepared for the writing of these books by traveling to over fifty-five cities to research every attraction referenced in every story. It is backed by a global team of writers, researchers and illustrators, who have helped make each book as authentic as possible. Each book includes a reference section highlighting key elements including the history of the destination, famous people, maps, local foods, and fun facts. Adventure cities books (www.citiesofadventure.com), published by Bombay-based on Imaginara Legacies, are available now at major online and physical bookstores. Additional books with Sydney, Tokyo, Copenhagen, Boston, London, Istanbul, and more will follow soon.

For more information on author Rishi Piparaiya (www.rishipiparaiya.com), publisher Imaginara Legacies (www.imaginara.com) and the Adventure cities books (www.citiesofadventure.com), please contact [email protected] or at +91 90 825 76227

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Rishi Piparaiya is a bestselling author and former executive who left his career-leading corporate position to devote himself to his passion for travel and writing. His first job, Alley be damned, a humorous book on air travel, was a national bestseller in India and his second book, Job be damned, was an acclaimed satire on corporate life. Adventure cities is his first children’s series. Rishi holds an MBA from Cornell University and BA from Rochester University.

Media contact:
Rishi piparaiya
[email protected]
+91 90 825 76227

SOURCE Rishi Piparaiya

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Robert ‘Bob’ Harris on his love for adventure stories https://greatmumadventure.com/robert-bob-harris-on-his-love-for-adventure-stories/ https://greatmumadventure.com/robert-bob-harris-on-his-love-for-adventure-stories/#respond Sat, 07 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://greatmumadventure.com/robert-bob-harris-on-his-love-for-adventure-stories/ Author interview: Robert ‘Bob’ Harris on his love for adventure stories Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. to cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret A block arrow icon pointing right. E-mail An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook A Facebook “f” brand icon. Google An icon of the […]]]>




Author interview: Robert ‘Bob’ Harris on his love for adventure stories


































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Seven Swords blends classic adventure stories into something spectacular https://greatmumadventure.com/seven-swords-blends-classic-adventure-stories-into-something-spectacular/ https://greatmumadventure.com/seven-swords-blends-classic-adventure-stories-into-something-spectacular/#respond Fri, 18 Jun 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://greatmumadventure.com/seven-swords-blends-classic-adventure-stories-into-something-spectacular/ Seven Swords, from AfterShock Comics, mixes some of the world’s greatest adventure stories into an absolutely spectacular debut film. Spoilers for Seven swords # 1 before! AfterShock Comics New Seven swords mixes some of the world’s most enduring adventure stories into a catchy and spectacular comic book that is sure to be another hit for […]]]>

Seven Swords, from AfterShock Comics, mixes some of the world’s greatest adventure stories into an absolutely spectacular debut film.

Spoilers for Seven swords # 1 before!

AfterShock Comics New Seven swords mixes some of the world’s most enduring adventure stories into a catchy and spectacular comic book that is sure to be another hit for the company. Written by Evan Daugherty with illustrations by Riccardo Latina and colors by Valentina Bianconi, the first issue is now on sale in print and digital versions.

In less than a decade, AfterShock has grown into one of the most exciting publishers in the industry, bringing together established talents such as Garth Ennis and Paul Jenkins, as well as newcomers such as the Miranda brothers; the company has received numerous awards. AfterShock also brought in talent from outside the industry. Seven swords scribe Evan Daughtery comes from the world of cinema, having written films such as Snow White and the Hunter as well as the adaptation of Divergent. Daughtery teams up with Latina and Bianconi and appeals to those cinematic sensibilities Seven swords.


Related: AfterShock’s Almost American Spills Secrets of Real Life Spies

Seven swords uses the classic novel The three Musketeers by Alexander Dumas as a starting point. In the novel, the titular heroes team up with a new recruit, D’Artagnan, to stop the evil Cardinal Richelieu. Seven swords imagine a world where the Musketeers have been killed, and now Richelieu has turned to the dark world of occultism; it is up to d’Artagnan to stop him. Richelieu found an ancient weapon in Mexico and will stop at nothing to obtain it. D’Artagnan’s mentor, Treville, tells him to assemble a new team of warriors, all skilled with swords, to stop the evil Cardinal. He then meets, and fights, Sister Catalina, the group’s first recruit. Treville presents D’Artagnan with a list of the remaining members and among them are Don Juan and Cyrano de Bergerac. D’Artagnan must reassemble the team and stop Richelieu before it is too late.

AfterShock, seven swords

D’Artagnan and Richelieu are only the first in a line of characters, both fictional and historical, who make their appearance. Don Juan and Cyrano de Bergerac have both appeared in literary works and Sister Catalina can be considered a replacement for Joan of Arc. This skillful mix of classic literary and historical figures is reminiscent of Alan Moore and Kevin O’Neill League of Extraordinary Gentlemen. D’Artagnan must bring together seven different warriors to fight a common enemy, reminiscent of Akira Kurosawa’s epic Seven Samurai and its American remake The Magnificent Seven. It never seems derivative, as the creative team take the best aspects of everyone, creating an exciting debut issue that captivates readers and never lets them go.

AfterShock Seven swords # 1 is a spectacular start, giving classic adventure stories a new twist. Daughtery, Latina and Bianconi have created the next big title AfterShock, not to be missed.

Next: AfterShock’s Silver City Gives The Afterlife A Unique, Intricate Twist

task-everything-could-1-my hero university

My Hero Academia stain urges everyone to stop it for good


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Dragon Ball proves age doesn’t make sense for adventure stories https://greatmumadventure.com/dragon-ball-proves-age-doesnt-make-sense-for-adventure-stories/ https://greatmumadventure.com/dragon-ball-proves-age-doesnt-make-sense-for-adventure-stories/#respond Thu, 21 Jan 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://greatmumadventure.com/dragon-ball-proves-age-doesnt-make-sense-for-adventure-stories/ With a history spanning decades, the main characters in Dragon Ball stay fit in battle even as they age considerably. Akira Toriyama’s beloved in the world Dragon ball The franchise has followed its protagonist Goku since he was a young boy as he grew up to be a full-fledged family man and grandfather himself, still […]]]>

With a history spanning decades, the main characters in Dragon Ball stay fit in battle even as they age considerably.

Akira Toriyama’s beloved in the world Dragon ball The franchise has followed its protagonist Goku since he was a young boy as he grew up to be a full-fledged family man and grandfather himself, still staying sharp enough to defend Earth as his own. most powerful warrior.

And while Goku didn’t lose a step in entering his fifties, Dragon ball has defied the expectations of ageists since the early days of the franchise, with older characters continuing to defend against increasingly powerful opponents as the story progresses decades. This distinction extends beyond the Saiyan leading to his human figures, still perfectly capable of knocking down without missing a beat as they endure the passage of time.


RELATED: Dragon Ball: Demons Are Barely The Coolest Race In Anime

For Saiyan characters, like Goku and Vegeta, Toriyama explained how both characters are able to maintain their relatively young looks, even as they enter their forties and fifties. At the end of Dragon ball z, Vegeta disdainfully observes that Saiyans have a genetic trait that allows them to age at a noticeably slower rate than humans so they can fight longer at their physical peak. While Vegeta pushes sixty Dragon ball gt, he continues to grow stronger, achieving the Super Saiyan 4 transformation, as he and Goku unlock new battle strength boards in the Z series of suites Dragon ball super.

Dragon ball introduces human fighters the same age, if not years older than Goku, including Tien and Krillin. Originally named Goku’s rival before becoming his best friend, Krillin was the same age as Goku at the start of Dragon ball and pushes forty at the start of Great. Undeterred, Krillin more than proved that he still has his edge during Great, training with Gohan stationary before the Tournament of Power despite his retirement from martial arts to focus on fatherhood and his career as a police officer.

Yours proved even stronger for Great, although he’s about five years older than Goku and Krillin, still outlasts Krillin during the Tournament of Power, and takes on more opponents from the Dragon Ball multiverse.

RELATED: Dragon Ball: 5 Scenes That Changed Goku Forever

The poster boy for Dragon ball One of the characters defying the expectations of the age is Master Roshi, a man who has become one of the most powerful fighters in the entire series despite his centuries. With her life extended by drinking holy water, Roshi was able to beat Goku, Krillin, Yamcha and fight Tien to a standstill during the original series. While Roshi took a backseat for much of DBZ, he came back in style for the Tournament of Power in Great, surviving opponents significantly stronger than himself as he showed all his combat prowess and experience to great effect.

While Dragon ball has always featured new generations of fighters perfectly capable of fighting alongside and against adults – from Goku and Krillin at the start of Dragon ball to Gohan, Trunks and Goten during DBZ – previous generations are still perfectly capable of throwing down even as they enter middle age and their twilight years. From the inherent genetic advantage of the Saiyans to the prodigious fitness regimes of human martial arts masters and the mastery of their combat effectiveness, Dragon ball was never a young fighter’s game.

And with Goku and the Z Fighters committing decades to history, Dragon ball is all the proof you need to say that getting older doesn’t mean giving up on life.

KEEP READING: Dragon Ball Proves Saiyans’ Greatest Strength Is Their Ultimate Weakness

Was Naruto Vs. Isshiki Boruto's Best Battle?

Was Naruto Vs. Isshiki Boruto’s Best Battle?


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Stories Untold experimental narrative adventure launches on Xbox One and PS4 https://greatmumadventure.com/stories-untold-experimental-narrative-adventure-launches-on-xbox-one-and-ps4/ https://greatmumadventure.com/stories-untold-experimental-narrative-adventure-launches-on-xbox-one-and-ps4/#respond Tue, 27 Oct 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://greatmumadventure.com/stories-untold-experimental-narrative-adventure-launches-on-xbox-one-and-ps4/ If the in-game scene was filled with similar experiences, it would become extremely outdated, extremely quickly. And so, when we find something on Xbox One and PS4 that threatens to tear up the rulebook and attempt something different, our ears straighten. This is the case here today with the launch of Untold Stories. Not to […]]]>

If the in-game scene was filled with similar experiences, it would become extremely outdated, extremely quickly. And so, when we find something on Xbox One and PS4 that threatens to tear up the rulebook and attempt something different, our ears straighten. This is the case here today with the launch of Untold Stories.

Not to be confused with Lovecraft’s Untold StoriesDevolver Digital’s Stories Untold takes the usual kind of storytelling before folding it and blending it into something a little more unique, delivering four short stories for players in a mysterious anthology.

Priced at £ 8.39 on the Xbox Store, with a small introductory discount lower than the £ 7.99 from PlayStation Store asking price, Untold Stories mixes classic text-based adventures with point-and-click elements. The hope is that this in turn will make for a rather fascinating, rather fantastic experience.

With old-fashioned retro visuals, a sublime synth-wave soundtrack, and plenty of genre leaps, if you’re looking for something to get your teeth into, Stories Untold might just deliver.

  • – Four unique stories, with their own settings, gameplay and mechanics.
  • – Play mind-blowing text adventures, process radio transmissions, and conduct bizarre artifact experiments.
  • – A magnificent retro-aesthetic brings back vivid memories, or a glimpse of what once was.
  • – Sublime synth-wave horror soundtrack, inspired by horror soundtracks of the 80s.
  • – Genre leap: from psychological horror to tense mystery and terrifying science fiction; Stories Untold is really “4 stories, 1 nightmare”.

To get involved in these latest stories on Xbox One and PS4, simply head to your favorite digital store. We’ll definitely get a little preview of the Xbox One version of Stories Untold coming in the coming days as well.

Description of the game:

“Stories Untold” is an experimental storytelling adventure game that turns the genre into something completely unique. Combining a blend of classic text-based adventure, point-and-click and more, 4 short stories come together in a single mysterious anthology that has been described as “a fantastic and fascinating example of interactive visual storytelling” (Telegraph 5/5) and has received critical acclaim since its release.


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Solo travelers share their most dangerous adventure stories https://greatmumadventure.com/solo-travelers-share-their-most-dangerous-adventure-stories/ https://greatmumadventure.com/solo-travelers-share-their-most-dangerous-adventure-stories/#respond Fri, 04 Sep 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://greatmumadventure.com/solo-travelers-share-their-most-dangerous-adventure-stories/ Traveling and seeing as many people as possible is an interest shared by millions of people around the world. To experience the culture, the food, the sights of a completely foreign place conjures up an experience unlike many others. It’s something many aspiring Bear Grylls like to tackle on their own, packing the essentials in […]]]>

Traveling and seeing as many people as possible is an interest shared by millions of people around the world. To experience the culture, the food, the sights of a completely foreign place conjures up an experience unlike many others.

It’s something many aspiring Bear Grylls like to tackle on their own, packing the essentials in a single bag, hopping on a plane, landing in a new land, and sailing with nothing but a Lonely Planet guide.

And for the most part, traveling – especially solo – is enjoyable and memorable – and can cause some crazy experiences – and veteran soloists will tell you that once you get started, you’ll have the “travel bug” and won’t be able to. never give up until your bucket list is complete.

Of course, it’s well documented that not all countries are safe, and for solo travelers, not having that second or third person as backup can pose an increased risk of danger. But unless a reported incident gets enough media coverage to receive national or international media coverage, you don’t tend to hear about these negative stories.

This Reddit thread – started by Tommymel1989 – changed that, with the original poster regaling their South American kidnapping story and the effect it had on their lives.

“A few months after the start of our trip, we were kidnapped at gunpoint outside a cafe… we escaped with few injuries, but a lot of psychological trauma and still affect us at this. day.

“I’m saying it here, to help me recover from PTSD and put this behind me, but two, to talk to anyone who’s been through this or been in pain and how I got over it to start trusting and being able to leave the house without anger or fear held back in me.

“I guess this post is for me to release feelings and thoughts,” they continue,

“I am suspicious of people and act a bit oddly without realizing it in social situations due to the anxiety of being in an open space or near people I don’t know.”

Tommymel1989 describes the full abduction experience later in the article, which we encourage you to read.

It highlights the effect a dangerous situation can have on mental health, and given the many reactions other travelers have heard, it’s all too common.

User GregNortonsStache said: “I had a very similar event [sic] for me many years ago (with a knife rather than at gunpoint but still terrifying) also in Latin America. ”

“Spoiled a good time for me. I hear you talking about the fear of strangers and the general distrust of everyone – for me, I literally couldn’t get into a vehicle other than my own for about 5 months.

“I also felt very negative towards people in general – I felt like everyone was horrible and cruel in the world, and it took a long time to change that mindset.”

GregNortonsStache also admits that they “… saw a therapist for a few months, not sure if it honestly helped, maybe a little.”

“I just put my head down and did a lot of jobs and kept really busy and didn’t give myself time to think too much.”

While Latin America receives a lot of negative reviews, the original poster and commentators all say that sharing their experiences is by no means meant to prevent others from booking trips there, but rather to make them aware that risky situations are a very real threat.

However, it’s not just South America that’s dangerous – although, as a 2019 report found Venezuela to be the most dangerous place for solo travelers – as CheatReynold adds, ” I was assaulted and assaulted in Brussels, so even in places you might consider safe. thing can happen anywhere. I accidentally walked through one of the most dangerous areas of Istanbul but had no problem, yet got attacked in the EU capital? ”

“There is no one solution for all boating experiences like this. ”

Cherrib0mbb conjectures perfectly, saying, “Many places in the world are safe to explore, but in countries with a lot of political turmoil and poverty, you really have to be careful and do your research (real research, no stereotypes), or just avoid it altogether if you are looking to have fun.

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Best Young Adult Books 2020: From Dystopian Fiction to Adventure Stories https://greatmumadventure.com/best-young-adult-books-2020-from-dystopian-fiction-to-adventure-stories/ https://greatmumadventure.com/best-young-adult-books-2020-from-dystopian-fiction-to-adventure-stories/#respond Thu, 23 Jul 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://greatmumadventure.com/best-young-adult-books-2020-from-dystopian-fiction-to-adventure-stories/ YA is the abbreviation for “young adult” but the genre is increasingly read by adults. You’re almost as likely to spot an adult commuter browsing the pages of a YA novel as you were as a teenager. The term YA was originally coined in the 1960s as the official way of describing books intended for […]]]>

YA is the abbreviation for “young adult” but the genre is increasingly read by adults. You’re almost as likely to spot an adult commuter browsing the pages of a YA novel as you were as a teenager.

The term YA was originally coined in the 1960s as the official way of describing books intended for 12-18 year olds.

In the years that followed, YA was used to define a wide range of books – ranging from The foreigners by SE Hinton and Suzanne Collins The hunger Games trilogy at The hate you give by Angie Thomas, zeros and crosses by Malorie Blackman and The fault of our stars by John Green.

Today’s YA literary titles include a plethora of beautifully written novels by authors who are not afraid to tackle hard-hitting subjects.

We’ve picked some of the best YA novels that have been published over the past 12 months or so, judging them on their subject matter, originality, and readability.

The themes they cover are impressively diverse. The stories include a pair of teenage brothers who traverse the Yorkshire moors in frigid conditions, a young albino boy struggling to earn a spot on the Zimbabwe National Swim Team, and a homeless girl who befriends her. friendship with an old woman with dementia.

You can trust our independent reviews. We may earn commissions from some retailers, but we never allow this to influence selections, which are formed from actual testing and expert advice. These revenues help fund journalism through The independent.

‘The Great Godden’ by Meg Rosoff, published by Bloomsbury

When Meg Rosoff won the Astrid Lindgren Memorial Prize, the world’s largest award for children’s and young adult literature, in 2016, the jury members were rave. “Meg Rosoff’s young adult novels speak to the emotions as well as to the intellect,” they said. “She leaves no reader indifferent.”

They were absolutely right. Now the author of the classic How i live now is back with a new novel from YA – a coming-of-age story of two families whose lives collide in a seaside vacation home. When the two Godden brothers, the charismatic and golden boy Kit and the surly and vigilant Hugo, arrive in their midst, there are bound to be devastating consequences – and of course, by the end of the summer, everyone’s lives have been turned upside down. Rosoff’s dazzling and timeless novel is a delight.

“The colors that blind” by Rutendo Tavengerwei, published by Hot Key Books

Tumi is a 14 year old albino boy who lives with his older brother. Desperate to earn a spot on the Zimbabwe national swim team, he sees the pool as a place to escape the hatred and exclusion he encounters on a daily basis. But when he and his fiery young niece Noku are sent to Ambuya, Tumi’s grandmother, a traumatic incident from his childhood comes back to haunt him.

However, Ambuya has her own heartbreaking past and as she tells Tumi about her horrific experiences of racial hatred in war-torn Rhodesia, he begins to understand her family history. Tavengerwei lived and studied in Zimbabwe until the age of 18, and his second novel is a compassionate and eye-opening read.

‘The Premier of Miss Jean Brodie’ by Muriel Spark, published by Barrington Stoke

Publisher Barrington Stoke prides itself on its inclusiveness and specializes in producing books in a format suitable for dyslexia. Teens today will appreciate the story of Muriel Spark, an outspoken teacher whose unconventional ideas put her at odds with staff at an Edinburgh school.

This new edition is printed in two colors, using black text and pale yellow pages “to help relieve the effects of visual stress” and the typeface has been specially designed to be easier to read. That aside, the book is a classic that still resonates today – and adults will appreciate it, too.

Anthony McGowan’s ‘Alouette’, published by Barrington Stoke

When Anthony McGowan started to write Brock, his gritty tale of two teenage brothers whose dad starts drinking when their mom leaves, he never considered producing three more sibling books. “But every time I typed ‘The End’ I felt like Nicky and Kenny’s story was unfinished,” he says. Lark is the fourth in the series and sees the duo trek through the Yorkshire moors in freezing conditions.

As with McGowan’s previous books, Brock, Pike and Tower, it’s a powerful and heart-wrenching story and the well-deserved winner of the 2020 Carnegie Medal. The truth of things, a collected edition of the four short stories in one volume, is also available.

‘Toffee’ by Sarah Crossan, published by Bloomsbury

Written in free verse, Toffee tells the story of Allison, who ran away from her abusive father. Homeless and broke, she hides in the shed of what she assumes is an abandoned house.

But it actually belongs to Marla, a lonely old woman with dementia. Marla mistakes Allison for Toffee, a friend from the past, and invites her in – so Allison reinvents herself as Toffee and stays. This insightful novel was published in paperback in February and is an outstanding YA read.

‘Dear Evan Hansen’ by Val Emmich, Steven Levenson, Benj Pasek and Justin Paul, posted by Penguin

Dear Evan Hansen started life as an award-winning Broadway musical and later moved to London. The show was so successful that Val Emmich and the show’s creators, Steven Levenson, Benj Pasek, and Justin Paul decided to make it into a novel.

Teenager Evan Hansen feels lonely and invisible, so his therapist encourages him to write positive notes. When a struggling classmate commits suicide, Evan claims the boy was his secret best friend – a lie that gets more and more complicated. It’s an insightful story that touches on grief, authenticity, and the struggle to be and belong.

“The Girl Who Came Out of the Woods” by Emily Barr, published by Penguin

Emily Barr’s third teenage thriller is a gripping novel that will turn pages until the wee hours of the morning. Arty enjoys his idyllic life and nature deep in an Indian forest.

But when her community is struck by a terrible disease, she is propelled into the outside world, where people follow her with every move, strangers post photos of her on Instagram and she discovers a family thousands of miles away. that she didn’t know she had. Look for Barr’s new YA book, Things to do before the end of the world, which will be released next year (2021).

“Furious Thing” by Jenny Downham, published by David Fickling Books

Jenny Downham’s first tearful novel, Before i die, was made into a blockbuster movie starring Dakota Fanning. In her latest book, 15-year-old Lexi is strong-willed and tough at home and at school.

She adores her mother and her little sister but disagrees with her future manipulative stepfather. This compelling tale was shortlisted for the 2019 Costa Children’s Book Award and the 2020 YA Book Award, with one reviewer describing it as “The catcher in the rye for 2020, a burning look at the anger, frustration and apathy of adolescents ”.

‘Hawk’ by James Patterson and Gabrielle Charbonnet, published by Young Arrow

Fans of dystopian fiction will enjoy this thrilling new YA novel from bestselling author James Patterson. Co-written with Gabrielle Charbonnet, falcon is the tenth story in the Maximum Ride series and follows the adventures of Hawk, Max and Fang’s 15-year-old daughter, as she struggles to survive in post-apocalyptic New York City.

Hawk doesn’t know her real name or who her parents were, but every day at 5 p.m. she waits around the same corner for them to come back – just like they asked her to do when she was little. Patterson is second to none when it comes to writing fast-paced thrillers and this one has it all – an intriguing plot, gripping action, and a gripping main character.

You don’t need to have read the previous tales to enjoy them, but if you’re captivated, you can go back to the beginning and read all 10.

‘Wonderland’ by Juno Dawson, published by Quercus

Juno Dawson won this year’s YA Book Prize for Meat market, an exposition of the dark side of the fashion industry. Wonderland, his latest, is an uncompromising 21st century tale of Lewis Carroll’s classic Alice. Adventures in Wonderland. Teenage Alice Dodgson (Dodgson was Lewis Carroll’s real name) lives a life of luxury in London, but when her troubled friend Bunny goes missing, she becomes obsessed with finding her.

But instead of ending up at the Mad Hatter’s tea party, Alice discovers a mysterious invitation to Wonderland – a three-day party of hedonistic excess where only the elite are welcome. A sleek, clever, and self-explanatory story about sanity, gender, privilege, and ending up in toxic times.

The verdict: books for young adults

For a book that will stand the test of time and that we will come back to time and time again, Meg Rosoff The Great Godden gets our vote. But Anthony McGowan’s Lark is a close finalist and not to be missed.

IndyBest product reviews are unbiased, independent advice you can trust. On some occasions we earn income if you click the links and purchase the products, but we never allow this to distort our coverage. Reviews are compiled through a mix of expert opinion and real-world testing.


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[Review] Creepy Text Adventure ‘Stories Untold’ Gets Outstanding Nintendo Switch Adaptation https://greatmumadventure.com/review-creepy-text-adventure-stories-untold-gets-outstanding-nintendo-switch-adaptation/ https://greatmumadventure.com/review-creepy-text-adventure-stories-untold-gets-outstanding-nintendo-switch-adaptation/#respond Thu, 23 Jan 2020 08:00:00 +0000 https://greatmumadventure.com/review-creepy-text-adventure-stories-untold-gets-outstanding-nintendo-switch-adaptation/ Magnets in slow motion of 80’s cathode ray tubes with woodgrain panels. The click-click of keyboard keys when entering a text command. The whine of a microfiche reader zooming in on black and white film. Untold Stories is a throwback to old parser-based textual adventures modernized to take advantage of the atmospheric tension that 3D […]]]>

Magnets in slow motion of 80’s cathode ray tubes with woodgrain panels. The click-click of keyboard keys when entering a text command. The whine of a microfiche reader zooming in on black and white film.

Untold Stories is a throwback to old parser-based textual adventures modernized to take advantage of the atmospheric tension that 3D art can provide. You’re not playing a text adventure yourself here. Instead, you are an invisible character interacting with a series of computers via text commands in a series of seemingly unrelated situations. With this meta-configuration, Untold Stories becomes, not only a throwback to the textual games of the past, but a meditation on how technology mediates the stories we tell and how we tell them. Fittingly, NoCode’s 2017 PC game has been smartly modernized so that its themes are effectively expressed using the capabilities of its new home, the Switch.

A more direct port – one that sought to recreate the parser-based interactions of the original on a controller – probably would have made a good game feel like it was grabbing your eShop password for three hours. Thankfully, the version we got basically looks like the PC original and tells the same stories, but with some surprising tweaks to its mechanics that make a typing game run awesomely on a controller.

To do this, NoCode has completely removed the entry. Instead of, Untold Stories on Switch submarines in a Monkey Island style menu. You choose an action, such as “Go”, and then associate it with an available object, such as “upstairs.” This is a seemingly minor change, but at times it fundamentally alters the gaming experience. On the one hand, it makes Untold Stories easier – rather than racking your brains for a possible next step, you can just pair actions with items over and over again until you find the right one. But that doesn’t reduce the challenge of times when the game eschews text-based gameplay, which is just as difficult as ever.

Through its four disparate but connected chapters (which I deliberately don’t tell you much about), Untold Stories frequently tasks you with inserting commands into 80s style computers. At first, it just seems like an excuse to dress up its text-based gameplay with a Strange things coat of paint. But, the fascination of the game runs deeper than that. NoCode wants you to learn how to use their virtual machines; to find out how they facilitate and limit interaction with the world.

Sometimes that means reading an in-game manual that teaches you how to use an x-ray machine or acoustic resonance technology. Sometimes that means playing with multiple zooms to make out a little word on a microfiche film. Sometimes that means banging your head against a wall for an hour because you just can’t tell if the last beep in a series of Morse beeps is a full beep or a half beep. It’s a horror story where its sometimes elegant, sometimes clumsy technology is both mean and monstrous.

With Untold Stories and 2019 Observation, NoCode has carved out a unique niche for itself. These are games that seek to capture the fun of successfully solving a problem when putting together a gaming PC. Sometimes it’s overwhelming. There were times during my game of Untold Stories when I was deeply frustrated with my inability to find my mistake and the game’s refusal to help me. But, I guess, for people who are having fun looking for the best graphics card or SSD for their setup, these games are catnip; inexpensive simulations of the real deal, with a cranky story for good measure. But, impressively, they still manage to communicate that thrill to someone who doesn’t care; to kind of make me, someone with a new and powerful gaming laptop, think – even just for a second – “Dude, that could be really cool building my own rig.”

Stories Untold review code provided by publisher.

Stories Untold is out now on PC and Nintendo Switch.


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